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F&S Fighting Knife

F&S Fighting Knife – Canadian Soldier

This is an original Third Fairbairn & Sykes fighting knife named to a Canadian soldier J.H.M. Evans with Army Number C-7379. He served the Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment within the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. The classic F&S knifes that is associated with the Commandos and Airborne troops was first designed in 1940. Capt. Ewart Fairbairn and Eric Sykes worked with Wilkinson Sword to produce what became known as the First Pattern F&S knife. To speed up production, the second pattern knife was approved with some differents. In 1943 the third pattern knife was introduced which had a simpler ringed grip with a rounded ball on the end.
The knife and scabberd are in good used condition. The handle is marked with a Broad-Arrow and number 12. The scabberd chape is marked with the initials of the soldier J.H.M. and the leather piece is marked with his name and Army Number. The elastic loop is broken.

Many of the F&S daggers were worn by the regular army. This is an interesting piece and a nice research project!

Out of stock

Description

This is an original Third Fairbairn & Sykes fighting knife named to a Canadian soldier J.H.M. Evans with Army Number C-7379. He served the Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment within the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. The classic F&S knifes that is associated with the Commandos and Airborne troops was first designed in 1940. Capt. Ewart Fairbairn and Eric Sykes worked with Wilkinson Sword to produce what became known as the First Pattern F&S knife. To speed up production, the second pattern knife was approved with some differents. In 1943 the third pattern knife was introduced which had a simpler ringed grip with a rounded ball on the end.
The knife and scabberd are in good used condition. The handle is marked with a Broad-Arrow and number 12. The scabberd chape is marked with the initials of the soldier J.H.M. and the leather piece is marked with his name and Army Number. The elastic loop is broken.

Many of the F&S daggers were worn by the regular army. This is an interesting piece and a nice research project!

Additional information

Weight 1000 g
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